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Study in Canada

When in Canada, you will find a throng of international students in every city. Amidst that crowd, you will recognise many Indian faces.

With its range of landscapes, glacial peaks, ice fields, green vegetation and massive mountains, there is a long list of Canadian scenic wonders for students to sight see while studying in the country. Most visited tourist spots at a quick glance are the Niagara Falls, the 135 km long Okanagan Lake with its Ogopogo lake monster, the Glacier National Park, the Banff National Park and the Canadian Rockies, to name a few.

Education system in Canada

The higher education system in Canada is not very different from the American education system, with a little influence from Britain. There are mainly three types of institutions: Public Universities: Public universities in Canada are run by the provincial, territorial or federal government funding besides receiving the tuition fees from students. Private Universities: Private universities in Canada are mostly funded by donations and research grants. These universities do not receive funding from the government bodies. Liberal Arts Colleges: Liberal arts colleges in Canada are pretty similar to that in the USA. These are either public or private colleges, with a primary emphasis on undergraduate courses in liberal arts.

Why study in Canada?

From natural peaks to skyscrapers, Canada has it all! Montreal and Toronto are two large cities that offer just about everything students could possibly ask for. Toronto, an ethnically diverse city is also a major centre of higher learning and research with many well-known institutions such as the University of Toronto. The City of Saints, Montréal, is one that defies all expectation with its lush mix of North American & European swagger and cutting-edge culture. The United Nations consistently ranks Canada as one of the best places in the world to live, given its low crime rate. There are also walksafe programmes, where volunteers assist people in getting to public transportation or their homes during late hours at night.

Study options

The price tag for higher studies in Canada is roughly half compared with other leading study destinations. Tuition fees vary from institution to institution. On average, students will have to shell out CAD 10,000–40,000 per year. Annual living expenses will depend on the living location you prefer and the type of accommodation that suits you, i.e., private, homestay or on-campus accommodation. On average, students pay CAD 6,000–8,000 per year for their accommodation. Of course, the transport and other expenses should be factored in. And one more thing that you can’t avoid is a health insurance that costs CAD 600 (approx.) per year.

International students can work part time for 20 hours per week – generally the first six months on campus and off campus post this period. Some universities with more intensive courses allow their students to work for nearly 12 hours since working for more hours can affect their students' performance. International students can apply for work permit post their studies, which gives them the opportunity to work in the country for a three-year period.

Scholarships for international students

Both government and non-government scholarships are available for international students in Canada. These include –

Government scholarships

  1. Canada graduate scholarships
  2. NSERC postgraduate scholarships

Non-government scholarships

  1. Canadian Rhodes Scholars Foundation scholarship
  2. Trudeau scholarships and fellowships.

in addition to this, there are some institution-specific scholarships for international students, such as scholarships of the University of Guelph, Queens University and Centennial College.

Benefits of studying in Canada

-You will have several options to choose from: big or small universities and small-town or city universities.

-Students can enjoy an active and varied lifestyle in this beautiful country, along with great health-care benefits, and the thing that Canada is most known for – politeness of the locals.

-Students will have incredible opportunities to meet like-minded people and gain valuable international student experience through student clubs and organisations.

permanent residency

Check Your Eligibility

Significantly, every permanent resident is given what is known as the Permanent Resident Card (PR Card); it's the certified proof of his unique position as a permanent resident of the nation. He has to produce it whenever the involved officials ask him for it. PR card permits a person to travel outside of Canada and re-enter country. Those entering the country on a short-term basis like an international student and/or a temporary overseas worker lacks Canada's PR rights and is not a permanent resident.
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Canada Permanent Resident Vs Canada Citizens

Some people over and over again fail to differentiate between a Canada Permanent Resident and a Canada Citizen even as they think the rights and obligations of these two are quite parallel. Yes, it's a fact that there is hardly any remarkable dissimilarity between the rights and responsibilities of a Canadian permanent resident and a Canadian citizen. Both possess the same right to get professionally associated with any company, apart from the federal or provincial administration (some checks do exist). In addition, the permanent residents much like the citizens have the right to join the nation's defence forces.

Free Profile Assessment and Visa Guidance

Still, the Canada permanent residents do not have several rights, as compared to the citizens of the nation. For example, they do not have the right to vote; they cannot contest for any kind of elected office; and much more importantly, possess the nation's passports. Apart from this, unlike the citizens, the permanent residents could be deported from the country for grave crimes committed inside the nation's territories. Last but not the least, although it is fact that the permanent residents have a right to submit a submission for citizenship, post 3 years inside Canada; it is not binding.